The latest Kelly Clarkson weight loss scam claimed she and other celebrities endorsed Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies, leading users to ask about ingredients and purchase the product from Amazon and Walmart.

In May 2024, Facebook users were served scam ads promoting supposed supplements about a supposed Kelly Clarkson weight loss product called Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies. However, no famous people have ever endorsed keto gummies for weight loss, Clarkson included. Further, there’s no credible evidence keto gummies can help a person lose weight. JordanLiles.com advises any readers thinking of attempting to order these products to not make any purchases through Amazon, Costco, Justified Laboratories, Vita Hot Deals, Vitamin Place, Walmart or any other websites. Instead, we advise readers to make a doctor’s appointment to speak with a medical professional about losing weight.

Kelly Clarkson Weight Loss Scams

For years, scammers have sought to pretend Clarkson and other big names – including Oprah Winfrey, Ree Drummond, John Goodman, Billy Gardell, Drew Barrymore, the cast of “Shark Tank” and many others – endorsed and provided favorable reviews for products like Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies, all by using the image and likeness of each of the celebrities in an improper and seemingly fraudulent manner.

Step One: Kelly Clarkson Weight Loss Scam Ad

The ad for Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies with Clarkson’s image and likeness reviewed by for this article read, “Kelly Clarkson’s Happy Days Sale Is Here!” It appeared as follows:

The latest Kelly Clarkson weight loss scam claimed she and other celebrities endorsed Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies, leading users to ask about ingredients and purchase the product from Amazon and Walmart.
No celebrities – Clarkson included – ever endorsed Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies.

This ad was just one of hundreds or possibly thousands of ads that have improperly featured Clarkson’s image and likeness with keto gummies, CBD gummies, keto oil or CBD oil over the last several years.

Meta – the parent company of Facebook and Instagram – has accepted an unknown amount of money to allow these ads in their ad library. There’s no publicly-available evidence of any ongoing investigation into why Meta keeps allowing scams in their advertising. Earlier in 2024, the company once again reported quarterly revenue in the tens of billions of dollars. In other words, the money is there to effect change on its ad platform and ensure users don’t see scams in paid ads. However, the company has yet to do anything truly substantial to stop the flow of their acceptance of money that helps scammers’ scams to thrive.

Step Two: Fake Facebook Website

The link in the ad with Clarkson for Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies led to the scam website 06oo.top (archived). The website was designed to fool people into believing they were still on Facebook and had browsed over to Clarkson’s personal Facebook page. The website looked just like Facebook with its design, logo and colors. However, again, it was a scam website.

The latest Kelly Clarkson weight loss scam claimed she and other celebrities endorsed Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies, leading users to ask about ingredients and purchase the product from Amazon and Walmart.
This scam website was designed to look just like Facebook. However, this was 06oo.top, not Facebook.com.

Users who continued scrolling down on the fake Clarkson Facebook post were then shown fake comments from people who supposedly left positive remarks about Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies. All links on the fake Facebook website led to the scam website buyactivbrands.com/v1.

Step Three: Keto Gummies Official Website

On the apparent official website for Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies – buyactivbrands.com/v1 – users were shown false information, including that CBS News, NBC, CNN, Women’s Health, Woman’s World, Honolulu magazine and the Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism medical journal all published something about the product. None of these publications ever did. Further, any supposed news articles about these products – aside from scam-busting articles – are usually sponsored content, meaning someone paid for the story to appear on the websites for Outlook India, Kirkland Reporter, Tribune India or some other supposed news website.

An Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies scam and fake reviews falsely claimed Kelly Clarkson and other celebrities endorsed the products and their ingredients for purchase from Amazon and Walmart.
The page where users would theoretically purchase this product – if not through another website such as Amazon, Vitamin Place or Walmart, for example – was filled with false claims.

The author of the buyactivbrands.com/v1 website falsely claimed Dr. Mehmet Oz endorsed keto gummies for weight loss and called Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies the “holy grail.” Again, no famous people have ever endorsed these types of products, nor has there ever been even a shred of credible evidence presented showing the gummies do anything at all to help with weight loss.

An Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies scam and fake reviews falsely claimed Kelly Clarkson and other celebrities endorsed the products and their ingredients for purchase from Amazon and Walmart.
More false claims appeared near the top of the page, including a scammy mention of Dr. Mehmet Oz.

Users who ordered one of the keto gummies products through a scam funnel like the one presented in this article would later find out they come with subscription charges of hundreds of dollars a month. Some users have mentioned before in comments on the Jordan Liles YouTube channel the return addresses included with these products are not real. Further, we have received comments saying people never ordered them but still got charged, never ordered them or got charged but still received them at their doorstep, and other combinations of weird patterns like this.

Keto Gummies Customer Support Phone Number

Any readers looking for an official phone number or email address for customer support and customer service for Activ Boost Keto + ACV Gummies can find that information right in this article. According to buyactivebrands.com, the phone number is (866) 207-7444. The email address is care@buyactivebrands.com. However, again, this is a scam website and consumers need to call their credit card company if they fell for one of the scams.

If any readers are wondering why these scams are allowed and believe Clarkson and other celebrities should speak out about this improper use of their image and likeness, the truth is they already have. Those warning messages only get so far before they lose steam and go away.

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